Project 52: Playing with [Green] Light (2)

Today’s post is for Project 52, a weekly blog project that I am working on with several other talented photographers whom I’ve come to know and love over the past year. In this project, we concentrate on light and spend several weeks exploring an overarching theme. In this month’s theme we are exploring the color of light.  The color of light can change, making it cooler or warmer, or even tinted toward green or magenta.  Sunlight is generally white or neutral in color, but even sunlight may take on a color when it is reflected off another surface or when certain wavelengths are absorbed by the atmosphere or other things.  And artificial light varies in color in many ways, of course.  This week we are focusing on light that is tinted green.  It is easy to recognize that light will tend to be “warmer” in certain scenarios or “cooler” in others, but light not only varies in terms of yellow to blue, but also in green to magenta.  Portrait artists are careful to avoid having their subjects appear green, of course, so this week’s task is quite challenging.  How do you find a way to play with the fact that light can, indeed, appear green, while still creating an image that pleases?  I am excited to see how my friends rose to the task.

As for myself, I avoided the prospect of ugly skin by shooting a silhouette.  A few weeks ago, when we were in New York City, we went to the Central Park Zoo with some friends.  This shot was taken when we were watching the penguins.  Alexa was in the arms of our friend Aaron (I noted in my Letters to Our Daughters post that there might be a little bit of a crush there) and watching the penguins dive in and out of the water.  The light behind them was green, though I emphasized it a bit in post for fun.  Her little pigtails just kill me!

KAC_2013_06_23_0244-2

Please continue along our creative blog circle to see what my lovely friend Kennedy Tinsley has posted.  Please click HERE to see Kennedy’s play on green light.

Project 52: Playing with [Violet/Indigo/Blue] Light (1)

Today’s post is for Project 52, a weekly blog project that I am working on with several other talented photographers whom I’ve come to know and love over the past year. In this project, we concentrate on light and spend several weeks exploring an overarching theme. In this month’s theme we are exploring the color of light.  The color of light can change, making it cooler or warmer, or even tinted toward green or magenta.  Sunlight is generally white or neutral in color, but even sunlight may take on a color when it is reflected off another surface or when certain wavelengths are absorbed by the atmosphere or other things.  And artificial light varies in color in many ways, of course.  This first week we will focus on cool light, light that is colored violet, indigo or blue.

In my first image, although my light source is the sun, I was shooting underwater in a pool in Aruba, so the warmer colors were absorbed and a cool image resulted.  For me, I enjoy the new perspective of seeing her from under the water, as well as the treasured memory of seeing her turn into a fish on this vacation.

KAC_2013_06_28_0066

 

 

In this second photo, I was photographing the girls on the beach after sunset.  At that point, the suns rays are below the horizon, but are reflected off the sky and take on it’s blue shade (I think anyway – I can’t promise that is the most complete scientific explanation).  So even the beautiful white sand now appears blue.    KAC_2013_06_25_0503

Please continue along our creative blog circle to see what my lovely friend Julie Mak has posted.  Julie has the most gorgeous use of color in her photography, so I am thrilled to see what she will do this month.  Please click HERE to see Julie’s play on night light.

Project 52: Playing with Directional Light (5)

Today’s post is for Project 52, a weekly blog project that I am working on with several other talented photographers whom I’ve come to know and love. In this project, we concentrate on light and spend several weeks exploring an overarching theme. This month we will be exploring directional light.  All light comes from somewhere, of course, and therefore has direction, but generally directional light is distinguished from flat, even lighting that tends to eliminate shadows.  Shadows in a photo help to give it a sense of three-dimensionality.

My shot from this week was taken in Aruba, where the girls and I were visiting, along with my parents.  One of my treasured traditions in Aruba is taking an early morning walk with my dad.  I am generally not a morning person, but I have become a bigger fan as time has gone by (and since sleep was sacrificed to children long ago anyway).  I particularly love the quiet time we have to speak and catch up.  Alexa joined us for a walk this past week, and I was able to capture her explorations, checking out a ship in the distance on a quiet stretch of beach.  The sun was still somewhat low in the sky, though already quite strong, creating a distinct shadow, so the direction is pretty clear.

KAC_2013_06_28_4923

I am also including a couple of posed portraits from this week, which utilize a more subtle directional light.  I am generally not a formal portrait kind of girl, but I find myself taking them when I am visiting with my family like I am now.  These were taken when we were about to head in to dinner at Ruth’s Chris (my dad’s favorite), but the sun was low in the sky and to camera right, just before sunset, so I dragged them out for a 5 minute photo op.  In the photo of the girls, it was a bit behind them and to the right (I would have loved to get them turned a bit more to the right for a bit more light on their faces, but getting them to pose at all was a big fat miracle).  Also, how cute are these dresses that my dad got for them?  Love!

KAC_2013_06_27_4819

KAC_2013_06_27_4836

Please continue along in our creative blog circle to see the creative work of my friend Kelly of K. Rox Photography.  Kelly is a Brooklyn based photographer who is spending this month celebrating her birthday.  Click HERE to see Kelly’s creative play on directional light, and don’t forget to wish her a happy birthday!

Project 52: Playing with Directional Light (4)

Today’s post is for Project 52, a weekly blog project that I am working on with several other talented photographers whom I’ve come to know and love. In this project, we concentrate on light and spend several weeks exploring an overarching theme. This month we will be exploring directional light.  All light comes from somewhere, of course, and therefore has direction, but generally directional light is distinguished from flat, even lighting that tends to eliminate shadows.  Subtle shadows in a photo help to give it a sense of three-dimensionality.

Grandma is going to be mad at me for posting this one, but I couldn’t help myself.  We are visiting my parents in NJ this week.  Earlier today I was hanging out with Alexa and I hunted for some nice light for a photo.  When I found some in the dining room, I put her down on the floor so I could get some pictures of her.  She was NOT happy with me for putting her down and immediately started crying for Mommy – even though I was two feet away, looking at her and talking to her, and she was out of my arms for less than 2 minutes.  Oh the drama!

KAC_2013_06_22_3876

Please continue along in our creative blog circle to see the beautiful work of my friend Julie Kiernan.  Julie is a wonderful family and senior portrait photographer based in Minnesota.  Click HERE to see Julie’s creative play on directional light.

Project 52: Playing with Directional Light (3)

Today’s post is for Project 52, a weekly blog project that I am working on with several other talented photographers whom I’ve come to know and love. In this project, we concentrate on light and spend several weeks exploring an overarching theme. This month we will be exploring directional light.  All light comes from somewhere, of course, and therefore has direction, but generally directional light is distinguished from flat, even lighting that tends to eliminate shadows.  Subtle shadows in a photo help to give it a sense of three-dimensionality.

This image was taken yesterday and is posted in honor of Father’s Day.  It’s a backlit shot and I confess that I fell into the unfortunate trap of backlighting, which is that it can eliminate those shadows that we hope directional lighting will create.  However, I love the soft, hazy effect and the very slight rim lighting that surrounds them.  It makes the image feel sentimental, which is pretty awesome for a Father’s Day shot, I think.

KAC_2013_06_15_0008

 

Please continue along in our creative blog circle to see today’s image by my talented friend Sarah Roemer Davis.  Sarah is an incredibly talented photographer from New York City, who takes photos of the streets as well as her two gorgeous little boys.  Click HERE to see Sarah’s latest directional light photo.

Project 52: Playing with Directional Light (2)

Today’s post is for Project 52, a weekly blog project that I am working on with several other talented photographers whom I’ve come to know and love. In this project, we concentrate on light and spend several weeks exploring an overarching theme. This month we will be exploring directional light.  All light comes from somewhere, of course, and therefore has direction, but generally directional light is distinguished from flat, even lighting that tends to eliminate shadows.  Subtle shadows in a photo help to give it a sense of three-dimensionality.

The photos below were taken yesterday morning.  Not long after she woke up and came downstairs wrapped in a blanket, I asked Avery if I could take a picture of her near one of our windows.  I knew that I was soon taking my camera to the shop to be cleaned and wouldn’t have another chance to get a picture for my blog.  She was reluctant to agree to let me take a photo – and refused to sit by the window, but instead lay on the floor, with windows above her and to her left.  She only agreed when I promised that the photos were for her friend James, whom she misses very much.  So, James, these are for you.  It is finally June and we will see you soon!

KAC_2013_06_08_0057

KAC_2013_06_08_0061

KAC_2013_06_08_0062

Please continue along in our creative blog circle to see the beautiful work of my friend Kim Dupree.  Kim is a wonderful photographer based in Texas, who is particularly known for her gorgeous senior portraits.  Click HERE to see Kim’s creative play on directional light.

Project 52: Playing with Directional Light (1)

Today’s post is for Project 52, a weekly blog project that I am working on with several other talented photographers whom I’ve come to know and love over the past year. In this project, we concentrate on light and spend several weeks exploring an overarching theme. This month we will be exploring directional light.  Directional light is just that – the light isn’t flat, it’s coming from one direction rather than straight on (side light, rim light, up light, etc.).

The below photo of Alexa was taken at our hotel in Washington D.C. this morning, with a large window to her right.  She had been crying – you can still see a couple tears on her face – but a cartoon managed to distract her and calm her enough so that we could get back to packing.  Side lighting tends to be a little bit “serious” or dramatic, and I like how that contrasts with the reality of what was going on.

KAC_2013_06_02_3669

Please continue along in our creative blog circle to see the beautiful work of my friend Jill Cassara.  Jill lives in Michigan and does stunning lifestyle portraits of her family.  Click HERE to see Jill’s creative play on diffuse light.

Project 52: Playing with Diffuse Light (4)

Today’s post is for Project 52, a weekly blog project that I am working on with several other talented photographers whom I’ve come to know and love over the past year. In this project, we concentrate on light and spend several weeks exploring an overarching theme. This month we will be exploring diffuse light.  Diffuse or soft light is the opposite of hard light, which we worked on last November.  Where hard light was small compared to the subject, resulting in dark shadows, soft light is large compared to the subject and results in subtle to no shadows.  Overcast days, open shade, or the sky (as opposed to the sun itself) are examples of diffuse light sources.  Soft light is often the easiest light to use, because it lights your subject rather evenly, but it can sometimes be a little bit boring, a little bit safe.

In the below photo, although the light itself was quite diffuse – it was yet another cloudy day here in Seattle (and the rain lasted all day long!) – by positioning Alexa perpendicular to the window, I was able to get directional light anyway.

KAC_2013_05_27_0308

Please continue along in our creative blog circle to see the beautiful work of my friend Kim Dupree.  Kim is a wonderful photographer based in Texas, who is particularly known for her gorgeous senior portraits.  Click HERE to see Kim’s creative play on diffuse light.

Project 52: Playing with Diffuse Light (3)

Today’s post is for Project 52, a weekly blog project that I am working on with several other talented photographers whom I’ve come to know and love over the past year. In this project, we concentrate on light and spend several weeks exploring an overarching theme. This month we will be exploring diffuse light.  Diffuse or soft light is the opposite of hard light, which we worked on last November.  Where hard light was small compared to the subject, resulting in dark shadows, soft light is large compared to the subject and results in subtle to no shadows.  Overcast days, open shade, or the sky (as opposed to the sun itself) are examples of diffuse light sources.  Soft light is often the easiest light to use, because it lights your subject rather evenly, but it can sometimes be a little bit boring, a little bit safe.

This image of Avery was taken on Friday, when she was participating in her very first fundraiser.  Her preschool has a sister school in Haiti, where access to clean water is a rarity.  Avery obtained a number of sponsors and then walked around the quarter-mile track 5 times – stopping to pick dandelions, of course.  We are incredibly proud.

KAC_2013_05_17_0445

Please continue along in our creative blog circle to see the beautiful work of my friend Kelly Roth Patton of K. Rox Photography.  Kelly is a fantastic photographer based in Brooklyn, NY.  Click HERE to see Kelly’s creative play on diffuse light.

Project 52: Playing with Diffuse Light (2)

Today’s post is for Project 52, a weekly blog project that I am working on with several other talented photographers whom I’ve come to know and love over the past year. In this project, we concentrate on light and spend several weeks exploring an overarching theme. This month we will be exploring diffuse light.  Diffuse or soft light is the opposite of hard light, which we worked on last November.  Where hard light was small compared to the subject, resulting in dark shadows, soft light is large compared to the subject and results in subtle to no shadows.  Overcast days, open shade, or the sky (as opposed to the sun itself) are examples of diffuse light sources.  Soft light is often the easiest light to use, because it lights your subject rather evenly, but it can sometimes be a little bit boring, a little bit safe.

The light in this image might be a little on the safe side, but that is ok by me.  For Mother’s Day, I wanted a picture of my two cuties together and I got one.  This was taken outside on a bright, sunny day, but the overhang of the building provided some perfect open shade.  This mama couldn’t be happier.

KAC_2013_05_11_0072-2

Please continue along in our creative blog circle to see the beautiful work of my friend Erica Collins.  Erica is a mom of five (yes, five!) who lives in Indiana.  Click HERE to see Erica’s creative play on diffuse light.

*** Also, one of Erica’s images from her blog Five Little Ones was nominated to be the April image of the month on Beyond the Wanderlust.  Please visit HERE to see it (it is a backlit image of her son wearing a mask) and consider voting for her.  You can vote by liking or commenting on her image by Tuesday, May 14th.  I love this image and am so very proud of Erica!***